Category Archives: Sufi

Gabriel and the Angelic Intelligences

Jibrail[Introductory note: What follows is a segment from the transcript of a telephone conference I participated in on February 6, 2017 between the Learning for Life Center in Topeka, Kansas and the multidimensional collective entity known as Monitor (channeled by Harvey Grady in Sedona, Arizona). I should mention here that I have been reluctant up to this point to pursue the significance of my acquisition of the name of Gabriel in the Fall of 2011. My troubled upbringing within what would today be called a Christian fundamentalist home had led me to be suspicious in adulthood of anything apparently related to that tradition. So I was quite surprised and even disturbed to have been presented with the name of Gabriel by the Spiritual Hierarchy at that time, although I did accept this (at the friendly urgings of a group of Crop Circle explorers in Avebury, England in early December 2011) and quickly grew into this new awareness of Self. The conversation that follows is one of my first attempts to gain some objective understanding of this presentation of a Higher layer of my Being. While in addition I am generally uneasy in devoting time to writing about myself, I believe that my experiences offer other Seekers confirmation of their own experiences in a culture that works against such understandings. I have been even more reluctant to claim some direct inspiration from the Angel Gabriel, not wanting to pose myself as seeking attention to myself, but I now feel it is time that I do so in as open, responsible, and detached a way as possible.]

MONITOR ON MY CONNECTIONS WITH THE ANGEL GABRIEL

GABRIEL:      Thank you, Monitor.  It is my turn now.  I was going to ask a question about recent ET interactions.  But I feel moved to ask about Gabriel and angelic intelligences, unless you think otherwise.  So I will go on the Gabriel question.  In a New Year’s divination exercise, I was presented with the following line from Henry Corbin’s book, The Man of Light in Iranian Sufism.  “We have learned that this red Sun and these reddening orbs announced the presence of the angel, Logos, or of one of the angelic intelligences.”  This message resonates deeply with me and is consonant with many of the prods that suggest that I have a destiny of some sort now with the angelic intelligences, not only with my High Self, but also with Gabriel.

In my work with Sufi gnosticism, I keep finding myself meditating over the role Gabriel plays in various theosophical circles, but even more specifically in my own life, not the least of which involves my receiving the name Gabriel in 2011.  For the highest good, is there a direct connection between my High Self, Samuel, and Gabriel?

How should I envision the nature of my Soul relationship and mission with Gabriel?  And how coincidental is it that these urgings most recently have come from within a Sufi context, one that – when withdrawn from its Islamic context – feels the most applicable to my own experiences so far?  Thank you.

man_of_lightMONITOR:    We note that you have been associated with the Spiritual Hierarchy and angelic kingdom in past lives, one of which involved a lifetime in a Sufi enclave situated in the mountains in northern Iran.

GABRIEL:      Yes.

damavandMONITOR:    Your personality’s relationship with angels represents a personal ability within the personality structure to accept angelic presence.  The Mental Judge Self component of the subconscious mind typically is fearful of angels and other high spiritual beings.  The Mental Judge Self typically creates a crisis to prevent or distract the Outer Self from angelic communication or contact.

In your personality, that encounter took place initially in the Sufi enclave.  The challenge was resolved when, through repeated fasting and prayer activity, your Mental Judge Self was assisted by your High Self to assume a more neutral role after having experienced an almost uncontrollable outburst of fear.  With your Mental Judge Self in a more inactive state, it was able to observe the activities of angels associated with that group and lose some of its fear of that form of superluminal contact.

In this lifetime, your High Self gave you opportunities, even in childhood, to sense the presence of other beings, benevolent beings, and that included the presence of angels.  You have had several angelic encounters to save your personality from harm in this lifetime, and so you have sensed that angelic connection.

Your Female Self has considerable angelic qualities.  And your Male Self has been able to accept those and respect the clarity and strength that the Female Self presents.

Your personality’s relationship with Gabriel denotes a relationship as a worker who at times assists in the accomplishment of certain tasks that Gabriel performs for the planet.  One of those major tasks involves communication among different Life forms and species.  Your life pattern has given you considerable curiosity so that you are able to explore different cultures, different times, and different beings beyond the physical realm.

Angel_GabrielYour connection with Gabriel involves your participation in communicating those experiences of greater insight and awareness of your “neighbors” to the public, to those prepared to accept what you share.  Not all are willing to consider what you share.  Yet by the act of sharing in writing and presentations, you are able to confirm the awareness of many others that benevolent beings exist that positively affect humanity and the planet.

Your role in communicating such experiences is still in its initial stages, yet shall develop into a much more informative sharing so that others who also share to some degree your innate awareness of neighboring species will be able to open their awareness productively and with security.

Corbin on Ibn ‘Arabī’s Theophanic Imagination

[The following is an excerpt from Henry Corbin’s amazing book Alone with the Alone: Creative Imagination in the Sūfism of Ibn ‘Arabī, Princeton: Princeton UP, 1969.]

1 . The Creative Imagination as Theophany or the “God from Whom All Being Is Created”

aloneIt will first be necessary to recall the acts of the eternal cosmogony as conceived by the genius of Ibn ‘Arabī. To begin with: a Divine Being alone in His unconditioned essence, of which we know only one thing: precisely the sadness of the primordial solitude that makes Him yea to be revealed in beings who manifest Him to Himself insofar as He manifests Himself to them. That is the Revelation we apprehend. We must meditate upon it in order to know who we are. The leitmotiv is not the bursting into being of an autarchic Omnipotence, but a fundamental sadness: “I was a hidden Treasure, I yearned to be known. That is why I produced creatures, in order to be known in them.” This phase is represented as the sadness of the divine Names suffering anguish in nonknowledge because no one names them, and it is this sadness that descended in the divine Breath (tanaffus) which is Compassion (Raḥma) and existentiation (ījād), and which in the world of the Mystery is the Compassion of the Divine Being with and for Himself, that is, for His own Names. Or, in other terms, the origin, the beginning is determined by love, which implies a movement of ardent desire (ḥarakat shawqīya) on the part of him who is in love. This ardent desire is appeased by the divine Sigh.

By an analysis in which he discovers the mystery of being in [184] the experience of his own being, the theosophist avoids from the outset the theological opposition between Ens increatum and an ens creatum drawn from nothingness, an opposition which makes it doubtful whether the relationship between the Summum Ens and the nothingness from which He causes creatures to arise has ever been truly defined. Sadness is not the “privilege” of the creature; it is in the Creator Himself, it is indeed the motif which, anticipating all our deductions, makes the primordial Being a creative Being; it is the secret of His creativity. And His creation springs, not from nothingness, from something other than Himself, from a not-Him, but from His fundamental being, from the potencies and virtualities latent in His own unrevealed being. Accordingly, the word tan u s also connotes “to shine,” “to appear” after the manner of the dawn. The Creation is essentially the revelation of the Divine Being, first to himself, a luminescence occurring within Him; it is a theophany (tajallī ilāhī). Here there is no notion of a creatio ex nihilo opening up a gulf which no rational thought will ever be able to bridge because it is this profoundly divisive idea itself which creates opposition and distance; here there is not so much as a fissure capable of growing into an area of uncertainty that no arguments or proofs can ever traverse. The Divine Breathing exhales what our shaikh designates as Nafas al-Raḥmān or Nafas Raḥmanī, the Sigh of existentiating Compassion; this Sigh gives rise to the entire “subtile” mass of a primordial existentiation termed Cloud (‘amā). Which explains the following ḥadīth: “Someone asked the Prophet: Where was your Lord before creating His (visible) Creation?—He was in a Cloud; there was no space either above or below.”

angelThis Cloud, which the Divine Being exhaled and in which He originally was, receives all forms and at the same time gives beings their forms; it is active and passive, receptive and existentiating (muḥaqqiq); through it is effected the differentiation within the primordial reality of the being (ḥaqīqat al-wujūd) that is the Divine Being as such (Ḥaqq fī dhātihi). As such, it [186] is the absolute unconditioned Imagination (kayāl muṭlaq) . The initial theophanic operation by which the Divine Being reveals Himself, “shows Himself” to Himself, by differentiating Himself in his hidden being, that is, by manifesting to Himself the virtualities of His Names with their correlata, the eternal hexeities of beings, their prototypes latent in His essence (a ‘yān thābita) this operation is conceived as being the creative Active Imagination, the theophanic Imagination. Primordial Cloud, absolute or theophanic Imagination, existentiating Compassion are equivalent notions, expressing the same original reality: the Divine Being from whom all things are created (al-Ḥaqq al-makhlūq bihi kull shay’)—which amounts to saying the “Creator-Creature.” For the Cloud is the Creator, since it is the Sigh He exhales and since it is hidden in Him; as such the Cloud is the invisible, the “esoteric” (bāṭin). And it is the manifested creature (āhir). Creator-Creature (khāliq-makh­lūq): this means that the Divine Being is the Hidden and the Revealed, or also that He is the First (al-Awwal) and the Last (al- Akhir).

Thus in this Cloud are manifested all the forms of being from the highest Archangels, the “Spirits ecstatic with love” (al­muhayyamūn), to the minerals of inorganic nature; everything that is differentiated from the pure essence of the Divine Being as such (dhāt al-Ḥaqq), genera, species and individuals, all this is created in the Cloud. “Created,” but not produced ex nihilo, since the only conceivable nonbeing is the latent state of beings, and since even in their state of pure potentiality, hidden within the unrevealed essence, beings have had a positive status (thubūt) from pre-eternity. And indeed, “creation” has a negative aspect, since it puts an end to the privation of being which holds things in their occultation; this double negativity, the nonbeing of a nonbeing, constitutes the positive act. In this sense it is permissible to say that the universe originates at once in being and in nonbeing.1

Thus Creation is Epiphany (tajallī), that is, a passage from [187] the state of occultation or potency to the luminous, manifest, revealed state; as such, it is an act of the divine, primordial Imagination. Correlatively, if there were not within us that same power of Imagination, which is not imagination in the profane sense of “fantasy, “ but the Active Imagination (quwwat al-khayāl) or Imaginatrix, none of what we show ourselves would be manifest. Here we encounter the link between a recurrent creation, renewed from instant to instant, and an unceasing theophanic Imagination, in other words, the idea of a succession of theophanies (tajalliyāt) which brings about the continuous succession of beings. This Imagination is subject to two possibilities, since it can reveal the Hidden only by continuing to veil it. It is a veil; this veil can become so opaque as to imprison us and catch us in the trap of idolatry. But it can also become increasingly transparent, for its sole purpose is to enable the mystic to gain knowledge of being as it is, that is to say, the knowledge that delivers, because it is the gnosis of salvation. This occurs when the gnostic understands that the plemulti successive forms, their movements and their actions, appear to be separate from the One only when they are veiled by a veil without transparency. Once transparency is achieved, he knows what they are and why they are; why there is union and discrimination between the Hidden and the Manifest; why there is the Lord and his vassal, the Worshiper and the Worshiped, the Beloved and the Lover; why any unilateral affirmation of a unity that confounds them, or of a discrimination that opposes their two existences as though they were not of the same essence, is a betrayal of the divine intention and hence of the Sadness which in each being yearns for appeasement in the manifestation of His secret.
The Creature-Creator, the Creator who does not produce His creation outside Him, but in a manner of speaking clothes Himself in it as the Appearance (and transparency) beneath which He manifests and reveals Himself first of all to Himself, is referred to by several other names, such as the “imagined [188] God,” that is, the God “manifested” by the theophanic Imagination (al-Ḥaqq al-mutakhayyal), the “God created in the faiths” (al-Ḥaqq al-makhluq fi’l-i‘tiqādāt). To the initial act of the Creator imagining the world corresponds the creature imagining his world, imagining the worlds, his God, his symbols. Or rather, these are the phases, the recurrences of one and the same eternal process: Imagination effected in an Imagination (takhayyul fī takhayyul), an Imagination which is recurrent just as—and because—the Creation itself is recurrent. The same theophanic Imagination of the Creator who has revealed the worlds, renews the Creation from moment to moment in the human being whom He has revealed as His perfect image and who, in the mirror that this Image is, shows himself Him whose image he is. That is why man’s Active Imagination cannot be a vain fiction, since it is this same theophanic Imagination which, in and by the human being, continues to reveal what it showed itself by first imagining it.

This imagination can be termed “illusory” only when it becomes opaque and loses its transparency. But when it is true to the divine reality it reveals, it liberates, provided that we recognize the function with which Ibn ‘Arabī  endowed it and which it alone can perform; namely, the function of effecting a coincidentia oppositorum (jam‘ bayna’ l-naqīḍayn) . This term is an allusion to the words of Abū Sa‘īd al-Kharrāz, a celebrated Ṣūfī master. “Whereby do you know God?” he was asked. And he replied: “By the fact that He is the coincidentia oppositorum.” For the entire universe of worlds is at once He and not-He (huwa lā huwa). The God manifested in forms is at once Himself and other than Himself, for since He is manifested, He is the limited which has no limit, the visible which cannot be seen. This manifestation is neither perceptible nor verifiable by the sensory faculties; discursive reason rejects it. It is perceptible only by the Active Imagination (Ḥaḍrat al-Khayāl, the imaginative “Presence” or “Dignity,” the Imaginatrix) at times when it dominates man’s sense perceptions, in dreams or better still [189] in the waking state (in the state characteristic of the gnostic when he departs from the consciousness of sensuous things). In short, a mystic perception (dhawq) is required. To perceive all forms as epiphanic forms (maẓāhir), that is, to perceive through the figures which they manifest and which are the eternal hexeities, that they are other than the Creator and never­ theless that they are He, is precisely to effect the encounter, the coincidence, between God’s descent toward the creature and the creature’s ascent toward the Creator. The “place” of this encounter is not outside the Creator-Creature totality, but is the area within it which corresponds specifically to the Active Imagination, in the manner of a bridge joining the two banks of a river. The crossing itself is essentially a hermeneutics of symbols (ta’wīl, ta‘bīr), a method of understanding which transmutes sensory data and rational concepts into symbols (maẓāhir) by making them effect this crossing.

An intermediary, a mediatrix: such is the essential function of the Active Imagination. We shall have more to say of it further on. The intellect (‘aql) cannot replace it. The First Intelligence (‘Aql awwal) is the first determination (ta‘ayyun awwal) that opens within the Cloud, which is itself the absolute theophanic Imagination. The intermedia between the world of Mystery (ālam al-ghayb) and the world of visibility (ālam al­shahādat) can only be the Imagination, since the plane of being and the plane of consciousness which it designates is that in which the Incorporeal Beings of the world of Mystery “take body” (which does not yet signify a material, physical body), and in which, reciprocally, natural, sensuous things are spiritualized or “immaterialized.” We shall cite examples to illustrate this doctrine. The Imagination is the “place of apparition” of spiritual beings, Angels and Spirits, who in it assume the figures and forms of their “apparitional forms” ; and because in it the pure concepts (ma‘ānī) and sensory data (maḥsūsāt) meet and flower into personal figures prepared for the events of spiritual dramas, it is also the place where all “divine history” is accomplished, the stories of the prophets, for example, which have meaning because they are theophanies; whereas on the plane of sensory evidence on which is enacted what we call History, the meaning, that is, the true nature of those stories, which are essentially “symbolic stories,” cannot be apprehended.

Stepping Into My Gabriel Nature

October 23, 2013

On October 14, the Monday of last week, I woke up with the knowledge that this was the day of the scheduled monthly phone conference call through the Learning for Life Center in Topeka with the collective entity known as Monitor. (While Monitor speaks in one voice, I refer to this voice as “they” in order to recognize the multiple nature of the collective, just as they refer to themselves as “we.”) I had a question but was reluctant to call, both because the question I wanted to ask seemed perhaps too private and because we cannot afford a call each month. As I conversed with Monitor in my head during the morning, they kept assuring me that I could get the answers I needed directly from them. Even so, I remained a bit agitated and anxious about missing the call, which started at noon Eastern time. Monitor suggested that I spend the time rereading Alone With the Alone, the Henry Corbin book that has been so moving for me this semester. So I did.

As I was reading along, trying to do so in a meditative and receptive state, I suddenly heard Monitor say, “This page contains the answer you seek!” Startled, I looked up at the clock and saw that it was 12:03. The conference call had just begun and I was listening through my own personal connection to Monitor!

The passage in the Corbin book proved to be stunning and I started to cry as I let its words and energies sink into my being. I was then asked to write the passage down and include this framing story with it, but with everything I had going during the week, I never got around to it. So this morning, after some more confirming messages in the past days from Monitor and other entities, I was asked again during my meditation session with Anna to be sure to record the passage that proved so meaningful for me last week. I am led to believe that this story of opening up to our intuitive voices and inspirations will prove important for others as well. So here goes!

The question I was struggling with that I wanted to ask Monitor during the phone session was this: “For a year now I have been receiving the message that I should ‘Step into my Gabriel nature.’ What exactly does this mean? What is my Gabriel nature, and how do I step into it? In short, who am I, especially in relation to the Archangel Gabriel?”

My reluctance to ask this question publicly involves my fear that such a direct identification with the Archangel will come off as pompous and prideful. Yet I have been reassured along the way that my stepping into my Gabriel nature is not prideful at all but rather celebratory. For, I am told, we all have our own Gabriel natures! Humans themselves are Terrestrial Angels. The Human Being is Infinite in potential, and fear and lack of confidence are the primary reasons why we do not more readily step into our Gabriel natures (which would mean something different for each individual personality, and would likely go under a different Name).

Abraham's Philoxeny

Abraham’s Philoxeny

The Corbin passage I was given grows out of a discussion of Abraham’s “philoxeny”—his kindness to strangers, to travelers—when he provides a feast for the three strangers who appear at his door, only realizing later that the three strangers are in fact angels.  The discussion continues (and I quote at length from pages 130-33 which page references in brackets):

And now, unexpectedly, the symbolic Imagination of Ibn ‘Arabi invites us to meditate and [131] perceive it in an entirely new way. His mental iconography represents the service incumbent on the fedele d’amore [the faithful servant to his or her Beloved] in the person of Abraham ministering to the three Angels seated at the mystic banquet to feed God or His Angel on His creatures, and that service is at the same time to feed the creatures on God.

For to feed on our being is to feed on His being, with which precisely He has invested us. It is to “substantiate” with our own passion the passion of the “pathetic God.” It is for His fedele “to make himself capable of God,” who though Beloved is nevertheless the first Lover, who though adored has summoned Himself to adoration in the adoration of His creatures and in them has brought to flowering the Image of primordial beauty which in them is the secret of suzerainty of love and at the same time the pledge of this secret. But to feed God’s creatures on Him is to reinvest them with God, is therefore to make their theophanic radiance flower within them; it is, one might say, to make oneself capable of apprehending the “angelic function” of beings, to invest them with, and perhaps awaken them to, the angelic dimension of their being. And this is itself an angelic service, as is suggested by the consociation of Abraham with the Archangel Michael, that one of the four Archangels, pillars of the cosmic Throne, who concerns himself with the substantiation of the universe of being. Abraham’s philoxeny, the mystic repast presented to the Angels, becomes here the most perfect image of devotio sympathetica.

As such, it is for the mystic a plastic symbol signifying the degree of spiritual realization that he must attain in order to become a Khalil, his God’s intimate. Here then, in conclusion, it will be incumbent on us to define the complex but characteristic notion of the Perfect Man, Anthropos teleios, Insan-i-kamil. First of all, we must be on our guard against the illusory pretentions arising from a conception of the universal which may satisfy the intellect but which, measured by the limits of our human modality, strikes us as an overweening and absurd spiritual pride. The first question is this: Should it be supposed [132] that the mystic realizes the type of the Perfect Man ontologically, in his very being, that is, can he in person become the perfect theophany of all the divine Names and attributes? Or should it be supposed that he realizes it noetically by having realized the meaning of the Names in his mystic consciousness, that is, by having mystically experienced the meaning of his essential unity with the Divine Being? If in experience the truth of the first concept is conditioned by the second, experience must also show us the way to a solution of the apparent contradiction between the two terms, neither of which can or should be done away with. They represent on the one hand the totality that the Perfect Man typifies mystically and on the other hand the singularity which attaches each particular divine Name to the fedele who is invested with it and whose Lord it is.
Far from being dispensable, the singularity of this tie is so precious that the Koran verse which is the expression par excellence of individual eschatology refers to it: “O serene soul! Return to your Lord, joyful and pleasing in His sight” (LXXXIX: 27). We have already explored the significance of this mutual pleasure: the Lord to which the soul is enjoined to return is its Lord, the Lord whose Name it bears and whom it has invoked, having distinguished Him among all others, because it recognized itself in the image it bore of Him, while He recognized Himself in it. As our texts observe, the soul is not enjoined to return to God in general, to Al-Lah, who is the All, but to its own Lord, manifested in it, the Lord to whom it replied: Labbayka, Here I am! “Enter my Paradise” (LXXXIX:29), that Paradise which is none other than yourself, that is to say, the divine form hidden in your being, the secret primordial Image in which He knows himself in you and by you, the image you must contemplate in order to become aware that “he who knows himself knows his Lord.” And to the Gnostic who in this “himself” attains the coalescence of the Creator and the creature, this is the supreme joy, unknown not so much to the believer pure and simple as to the theologian and philosopher. For [133] they posit a contingent creature, whom they oppose to the Necessary Being, thereby disclosing an inferior knowledge of God (for in it the soul knows itself only as a mere creature), a purely negative knowledge which cannot comfort the heart. The authentic mystic wisdom (ma‘rifa) is that of the soul which knows itself as a theophany, an individual form in which are epiphanized the divine Attributes which it would be unable to know if it did not discover and apprehend them in itself.  “When you have entered into my Paradise, you have entered into yourself (into your “soul,” nafs), and you know yourself with another knowledge, different from that which you had when you knew your Lord by the knowledge you had of yourself,” for now you know Him, and it is through Him that you know yourself.

Thus there can be no contradiction between your fidelity to your own Lord and the mystic vocation which is to tend toward the archetype of the Perfect Man, or rather, the contradiction was apparent only on the plane of rational evidences and contradictions. The divine commandment is to “return to your Lord” (not to Al-Lah in general); it is through and in your Lord that you can attain to the Lord of Lords who manifests Himself in each Lord, that is to say, it is by your fidelity to this Lord who is absolutely your own, it is in His divine Name which you serve, that the totality of the Names becomes present to you, for spiritual experience does not achieve this totality as one gathers the pieces of a collection or the concepts of a philosophical system. The mystic’s fidelity to his own Lord frees him from the dilemma of monism or pluralism. Thus the divine Name to which and for which he responds, performs the “function of the Angel” . . . as a safeguard against the sin of metaphysical idolatry.

One very interesting point is that I had read these pages a few times already and had, in fact, transcribed them into my notes on idolatry (which will be the topic of a future commentary). These very pages, then, had already been playing a role in my previous attempts to come to a basic understanding of Ibn ‘Arabi’s cosmography. Yet the particular significance of these pages as the answer to my own identity, especially in terms of the constant suggestion to “step into my Gabriel nature,” had not struck me when I read these pages earlier. Only now, when the question of identity was now squarely my question, did these pages strike me in their full power as a message from the Divine specifically to me. For this was the first time that the notion of the fedele struck me as an element of my own being, my own sympathetic relationship to God precisely through the mediating function of the Angel. Also for the first time, the expression “to make himself capable of God” finally struck me with full force, pointing out to me that “stepping into my Gabriel nature” involves “making myself capable of God,” that is, capable of receiving God’s loving turn towards me and capable, in turn, of returning the pathos by allowing for this Gabriel nature to perform the expression of Divinity that is implicit in Human Nature. As Corbin writes in his rehearsal of Ibn ‘Arabi’s work, I was finally able to recognize the significance of making myself capable of apprehending the “angelic function” of beings, including myself.

In so doing, I was now able to read the words explaining how such stepping into this angelic function, this “Perfect Man,” might be done without “illusory pretentions” or “overweening and absurd spiritual pride.” This involves the recognition of the distinction between (yet reciprocal, dialectical unity of) ontological and noetic definitions of self-identity. I do not simply or only become the being in whom the “perfect theophany” inheres but rather also function as the consciousness that mystically experiences “the meaning of his essential unity with the Divine Being.” Corbin goes on to warn that neither position should be rejected; instead, they should be seen as comprising “on the one hand the totality that the Perfect Man typifies mystically and on the other hand the singularity which attaches each particular divine Name to the fedele who is invested with it and whose Lord it is.” For now “it is through Him that you know yourself.” It is knowing God through my Lord (as manifested by Gabriel) that I come to know myself—in my Gabriel nature. “Thus the divine Name to which and for which he responds [for me, the Name Gabriel, perhaps as the Annunciator], performs the ‘function of the Angel’ . . . as a safeguard against the sin of metaphysical idolatry”—that is, the sin of positing the Divine as some eternally distant and external Being completely beyond my experience.

In short, if I were to reject my Gabriel nature, to refuse to step into everything that it involves out of a fear of appearing pretentious and overly proud of myself, I would end up guilty of just such metaphysical idolatry. I would, in other words, perpetuate the supposed gulf between myself and the Divine through rejecting the loving turn of God in His or Her pathetic gesture towards me—as towards all beings in their singularity and particularity. I would be rejecting the consciousness that makes manifest the Divine totality that is defined by my reciprocal relationship with and as my own personal Gabriel, through which relation I come to know both the Divine and myself. Stepping into my Gabriel nature means accepting the call to the Infinity that defines this precious Divine Being called the Human and to take my place in the totality of beings in the sacred round of Love.

Archangel Gabriel

Archangel Gabriel

The Triple Spiral of the Portals

October 4, 2013

I will attempt to reconstruct what I have learned in the past few days from my meditations on the hill above our house. There is a lot of information that remains fuzzy at the present moment, but a general structure of significance seems to be falling into place.

triple spiral

Triple Spiral

During much of August and September Anna and I were led to focus most of our attention here on the First Portal, which was revealed to involve a heavenly or celestial vortex. (For the sake of coherence, I will repeat some of the information I have relayed in previous accounts.) I had many direct and indirect encounters with the Archangel Gabriel here, as well as with Michael and other unidentified angelic powers. The general message seems to have been that we should continually anchor ourselves in this Angelic Force, not only for the gifts we would receive from such beings but perhaps even moreso because this would impel us to acknowledge and claim our own Angelic Nature. One aspect of this message is that humans are multidimensional, complex beings made up of many elements, including the Angelic. We are Terrestrial Angels.

The Second Portal was shown to involve the energies of an Earthly Vortex—that is, a vortex arising from subterranean sources. This portal is overseen by Water Fairies and represents a point of contact or entry into the subterranean water systems throughout the planet. I have been led through various meditations and exercises for connecting to and with these water forces. Given the fact that Fairies in general have a hard time dealing with the intensity of Human Energies, the Elves mediate between us and the Fairies in order to moderate the energy flow from us humans to the Fairies, just as the Elves mediate between Humans and Angels in order to lesson the intensity of Angelic Energies that Humans come into contact with.

The Third Portal, which I have barely been led to explore as yet, represents what I can only at this point call Alternative Realities. This seems to refer to dimensional planes that I cannot even imagine at the moment, planes that go beyond our usual spatial coordinates of Heaven (Causal), Earth (Physical), and the Underworld (Etheric). At the moment I can only imagine dimensional realms existing as alternative universes, realms of experience that we can slip into and out of, but not without preparation if we wish to avoid serious trauma.

Now to the realizations of the past three days: We were drawn to meditate on the hilltop in the meadow which we have mown and where we sit to enjoy the beauty of our surrounding landscape and the change of seasons. I was told ahead of time that this spot was not chosen randomly by us but has special energetic significance in relation to the rest of the property. After getting attuned through some Kundalini Yoga chants and our own Kyy Breath Centering Meditation, I was told to tap into the energies of the First Portal. As I was sitting facing north, this meant that the First Portal was off behind us to the left, or to the southwest of the hilltop. As I did so, I immediately felt the presence of Gabriel and was led through some connecting exercises to connect with my own Angelic Energies. This led to familiar and still amazing experiences as the energies flowed through my various bodies.

Next I was led to connect to the Fairies and Elves at the Second Portal, who took me through now familiar exercises in which I engaged with the forces of the entities themselves and then to the Water Elementals I again flowed through the subterranean water systems of the planet.

Then I was asked to open myself up to the energies of the Third Portal, which I hadn’t yet been invited to do. While the energies of the Angelic Portal tend to be very electric, as though currents of energy flow through me and extend my being into a larger energetic circuit, and the energies of the Second Portal feel, not surprisingly, more liquid and bubbling, the energies of the Third Portal felt much more substantial in the sense of solid and dense. Yet the feeling of these energies was very comforting and warming. If you could say that the First Portal energies give rise to a flying sensation and those of the Second Portal give rise to a swimming sensation, the Third Portal energies felt more like a warm, comfortable night in bed under wonderful blankets and on luscious pillows. I cannot think of any time I have experienced this particular quality of energy before.

The Triple Spiral

As amazing and welcome as this new Third Portal experience was, I had not yet experienced the greatest rush of flows yet to come. This happened when I suddenly began to notice that I could feel the energies of all three portals flowing through me (and me through them) simultaneously. I asked my Guide whether this were true, and the answer was that this was the most important experience for me to go through and ultimately to consider—the relationship between the Three Portals with us at the Center Point of perspective and signification. I was invited to bathe in this new combined flow, and as I did the image of the Celtic Triple Spiral suddenly appeared before my consciousness. I could at that moment see each portal simultaneously rotating in a counter-clockwise circle. What I mean by “simultaneous” is that even though each portal lay quite a distance from me in physical space and each in its own planetary location, I could literally see each portal spiral as if I were hovering over each simultaneously, seeing three different geo-spatial coordinates at once as they lay stacked on top of one another.

Newgrange Spiral Stone

Newgrange Spiral Stone

At the same time, nevertheless, I was seeing the very spot where Anna and I were sitting—the hilltop above the Second Portal and below the First (to the left) and Third (to the right up on the highest ridge top). And I realized that this spot was the point of convergence of the energies of each of the three portals. Just as I was seeing myself hovering above each portal, watching each spin in equal rhythm with the others, I could also see the spot where I was sitting serving as the conduit for the flows of all three portals. I said to my Guide, “This is the significance of the Celtic Spiral!” (which we had seen throughout Ireland during our travels in June), and my Guide said, “Yes!” I then heard the following statement: “The Image, the Word, the Object, the Gesture—all are portals, points of convergence where multiple realities intersect. The key is to recognize the invitation to travel these overlapping vectors, to see these points of convergence glowing in their infinite possibilities.”

This statement proves especially significant for me as I have been spending the past few weeks intensely reading the Sufi philosophers, especially Ibn ‘Arabi and Suhrawardi, and commentary on them by Henry Corbin. A key element of their thinking and spiritual experience for me is the way in which they approach the Image or the Figure—every Image and Figure!—as an archetype for the relationship between the Human Angel (humans in their angelic aspect) and the Holy Spirit as represented by (figured by) the Angel Gabriel. To have this energetic and imagistic revelation by means of the Angel-Elf-Fairy influence of my portal experiences was mind blowing! This was exactly the kind of unification of my spirit visions and my intellectual exercises that I had been seeking. And it all came via the image of the Celtic Triple Spiral which I had been meditating on for months in conjunction with the Kachina spiral images of the U.S. Southwest.

In short, things feel as though they are quickly and massively coalescing for me on a multitude of levels. Wow!